Den almenmuslimske klangbund

Daily Mail har en usædvanligt klar artikel om osmannernes folkemord på armenierne i 1915. Tyrkiets vrangvilje mod at erkende fortidens synder bliver forklaret med en national identitet, der ikke kan bære at det moderne Tyrkiet blev grundlagt på folkemord og etnisk udrensning (også grækere blev udryddet). Og sandt er det, at det ved lov er forbudt at fornærme tyrkiskhed. Men Tyrkiet er ikke Osmannerriget og kan ret beset ikke stå på mål for den historie. Skammen handler om islam. Osmannerriget var det nærmeste muslimerne kom et kalifat. Og Osmannerrigets forbrydelser er kalifatets forbrydelser.

Unleashed on the Armenians, Turkish policemen and soldiers ransacked Christian churches and handed bishops and priests over to the mob.

Community leaders such as doctors and teachers were hanged in batches on gallows in town squares. An American missionary reported seeing men tied together with their heads sticking through the rungs of a ladder to be lopped off with swords.

Torture was commonplace, Morgenthau maintained as he studied the evidence. ‘They would pull out eyebrows and beards almost hair by hair, extract fingernails and toenails, apply red-hot irons and tear off flesh with pincers, then pour boiled butter into the wounds.’

Crucifixion was treated as a sport. ‘As the sufferer writhes in his agony, they would cry: “Now let your Christ come and help you”.’

When orders were given to assemble all the Armenians and march them out into the desert, Morgenthau had no doubt that this was ‘the death warrant to a whole race’. Moreover, he said: ‘In their conversations with me, the authorities made no particular attempt to conceal the fact’.

He wrote graphically of how men were taken from their ploughs, women from their ovens and children from their beds to join ‘the panic-stricken throng’. Young men were strung up or shot — ‘the only offence being that they were Armenians’.

Convicts were let out of prison to help with the killings. Locals joined in, too. In Ankara, all Armenian men aged 15 to 70 were bound in fours and led out to a secluded valley, where Turkish peasants hacked them to death with scythes, spades and saws.

‘In this way, they exterminated the whole male population.’

For six months, as the enforced exodus went on, Morgenthau reported, roads and tracks were crowded with lines of Armenians.

‘They could be seen winding through every valley and mountain-side, moving on they scarcely knew where, except that every road led to death.

‘They left behind the unburied dead, as well as men and women dying of typhus, dysentery and cholera and children setting up their last piteous wails for food and water.’

How many died? Morgenthau reported that, on one particular death march, of the 18,000 who set out, just 150 were alive a week later.

A survivor recalled that ‘death was our constant companion. We fought the threat of panic, hunger, fear and sleepless nights but, in the end, they won. It seemed there was no pity or humanity in the hearts of our captors’. As they crossed the Euphrates river, one witness reported how ‘bloated bodies lay on the bank, black from the sun, tongues hanging out. Bones showed through decaying skin’.

‘The stomachs of pregnant women had been slit open and their unborn children placed in their hands like black grapes. Children were crying next to dead parents. Women were delirious.’

So many dead bodies clogged the river that its course was diverted for several hundred yards. But at least the water gave relief to some. Mothers sank into it gratefully, their babies in their arms, to drown and end their misery.

Women suffered special horrors. Aghavni — that girl whose story of stumbling on her father’s crucified and decapitated body we saw earlier — recalled how, in her home town, a group of 20 Armenian women were forced to dance under a blue, cloudless sky.

‘Turkish soldiers stood behind them shouting “Dance, sluts” and cracking their whips across their breasts, so their clothes would fall off. Some were half-naked, others tried to hold their clothes together.

‘The women were praying as they moved in a slow circle, holding hands. Occasionally, they would drop the hand next to them and quickly make the sign of the cross.

‘When they fell down, they were whipped until they got up and continued their dance. Each crack of the whip and more of their clothing came off.

‘Around them stood their children, who were forced to clap, faster and faster. If they stopped, they were whipped.

‘Some were two years old and barely able to stand up. They cried uncontrollably, in a terrible, pitiful, hopeless way.’ All of this was watched by a crowd of delighted Turkish townspeople in smart dresses and business suits, ‘clapping, too, like cockroaches’.

What came next was beyond belief. ‘Two soldiers pushed through the crowd, swinging buckets, and doused the women with kerosene. As the women screamed, another soldier came forward with a torch and lit each woman by her hair.

‘At first, all I could see was smoke. Then I saw the fire coming off their bodies, and their screaming became unbearable.

‘The children were being whipped furiously now, as if the burning mothers had excited the soldiers, and they admonished the children to clap faster and faster, telling them that if they stopped they, too, would be set on fire.

‘As the women collapsed in burning heaps, oozing and black, the smell of burnt flesh made me sick and I fainted.’

On the death march out into the desert, Aghavni remembered how women were openly tortured and abused. ‘If a woman would not readily submit to sex, she was whipped and, if she tried to run away, she was shot.’

She could only watch in horror as a girl resisted and a policeman took out his sword, ripped open her dress and then slashed off her breasts. ‘They fell to the ground and she bled to death next to them.’ Aghavni survived her ordeal — one of the few to do so. She lived, eventually making her way to America to give her first-hand account of a genocide that the Turkish authorities are still adamant did not take place.

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Det samme had ser man i dag i den muslimske verden. Man har altid set muslimske massakrer på deres omgivelser. Med jævne mellemrum bryder nye massakrer ud. Dengang som idag til de fleste muslimers store jubel. Nogle har ikonisk status, som the Ramallah Lynching, den palæstinensiske hobs slagtning af to israelske reservister. “The Israeli reservists were beaten, stabbed, had their eyes gouged out, and were disemboweled“. Al-Shabaab massakrerede alle der ikke kunne citere koranen på en skole i Kenya. Islamisk Stat libyske afdeling har just massakreret 30 etiopiske kristne. “Be til Allah eller dø!” råbte muslimerne førend de smed de kristne flygtninge overbord til druknedøden. Osv, osv. Muslimernes had til os andre, til alle faktisk er overvældende. Venstres Inger Inger Støjbergs møde med 4 arabere på en tankstation er mere end blot en ubehagelig oplevelse. Det er et varsel. Som Peter Hitchens skrev i Daily Mail; ”A wave of human misery is now heading to Europe” .

http://shoebat.com/2015/04/19/watch-the-amazing-30-brave-christians-slaughtered-telling-the-muslims-to-go-to-hell-and-refusing-to-bow-to-the-false-god-allah/x

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